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Intelligencer Journal
Published at: 11/05/2009

Intelligencer Journal

Man recounts Holocaust journey

Will tell his family's World War II story of survival

BY LORI VAN INGEN, Intelligencer Journal Staff

For many people, their knowledge of the Holocaust

begins and ends with concentration camps and gas

chambers.

But for Manheim Township resident Michael

Gleiberman, the Holocaust was intensely personal.

While Gleiberman and his immediate family

survived the Nazi onslaught in their native Poland,

members of his extended family were among the

millions of Jews in Europe who were killed.

Gleiberman will speak about his experiences at 7

tonight at Lititz Public Library, 651 Kissel Hill Road,

Lititz.

In an interview Wednesday, Gleiberman said "one

tyrant saved my life from another tyrant. (Soviet

leader Joseph) Stalin saved my life and my

parents and siblings."

Gleiberman recounted his life in Pinsk -- which was

part of Poland after World War I, but is now part of

Belarus -- from the time he was 12 years old.

Between 1939 and 1941, when the Soviets occupied Pinsk, Gleiberman's life stayed much the same. Only the language he used in his schooling changed, he said.

But soon Gleiberman's life would be turned upside down.

"Life takes twists and turns that you don't plan, but things just happen," he said.

His family was ordered out of their home by the Soviets and moved to a nearby town, Janovo, where they lived with a farmer. Later, Gleiberman, his two sisters and father returned to Pinsk to find a place to live.

"Then one morning, I woke up and people were being taken to the train in horse carts," Gleiberman said.

His mother and younger brother already had been picked up and put on the train, bound for Siberia. His older sister and father decided to join them, but Gleiberman said he and his younger sister wanted to stay with their grandparents in Pinsk.

However, the People's Ministry of Internal Affairs -- the precursor of the KGB showed up looking for Gleiberman and his sister. Their grandparents at first attempted to hide them, but were advised at the last minute to let them go.

"If the NKVD hadn't shown up, I wouldn't be here to tell the story. I would have lost my life in Pinsk," Gleiberman said.

Shortly after he and his sister joined their parents on the train, Pinsk was overrun by the Nazis. Ten thousand Jews -- including all of Gleiberman's extended family were killed in one day.

Meanwhile, Gleiberman and his immediate family were en route to Siberia in a closed cattle car.

"Food was scarce," he said. "Occasionally, they'd give us buckets of soup with salty herring, which made us thirsty. But there was no water. We had to lower a bottle by a string to beg people at the stations for water."

They were dropped off at Barnaul, in south-central Russia, not far from Novosibirsk, before traveling south to the little village of Topolnoye, which was a lot like the village in "The Fiddler on the Roof," Gleiberman said.

The Gleibermans spent two years there before moving to Semey, Kazakhstan.

They were no longer classified as "enemies of the people" by the Soviets.

After the war, they were sent to Stettin, Poland, before being smuggled into East Germany, then into Berlin and finally given clearance to emigrate to the United States.

In addition to Gleiberman's presentation at the Lititz Public Library, the annual

Intelligencer Journal: Man recounts Holocaust journey http://eedition.lancasteronline.com/pages/news/edition/IJAM/20090416/B...

1 of 2 4/16/2009 9:15 AM

Yom Ha'Shoah memorial program will be held at the Lancaster Jewish

Community Center, 2120 Oregon Pike, at 7 p.m. Monday.

This year, Joseph Puder, an Israeli-American son of Holocaust survivors and a columnist for the Philadelphia Bulletin, will present the story of his family members who perished in the Holocaust. The event is free and open to the public.

E-mail: lvaningen@lnpnews.com

© 2004-2007 Lancaster Newspapers

PO Box 1328, Lancaster PA 17608, (717) 291-8811

Intelligencer Journal: Man recounts Holocaust journey http://eedition.lancasteronline.com/pages/news/edition/IJAM/20090416/B...

 

"Gimansia Tarbut" Presentation
Published at: 22/04/2012
Click here to view (2.8MB PowerPoint file)
The Pinsk Association Archive
Published at: 04/05/2009

Has been sorted and organized by us and deposited for safekeeping in: The Central Archives for the History of the Jewish People. 46 Jabotinski St. Jerusalem. Tel: 02-5635716; Fax: 02-5667686. Mailing address: POB 1149, Jerusalem 91010 The manager of the archive, Ms. Hadassa Assouline, will welcome all who approach her  with requests to read or use the archival material of the Pinsk community.

List of 18,000 Jews from Pinsk Ghetto
Published at: 04/05/2009
before their murder at the end of October 1942.
To the list database
Explanation of the list of Pinsk Ghetto
Published at: 31/07/2006
This article was introduced by Nachum Boneh, translated to English and published in "Yalkut Moreshet".
Click here for the Explanation
To receive information about Pinsk Jews
Published at: 04/05/2009

* Between 18th century and 1920
The National History Archive - Minsk:
NATSIONALNYY ISTORICHESKIY ARKHIV
RESPUBLIKI BELARUS
KROPOTKINA 55,
MINSK 220038,
BELARUS

* Between The Two World Wars 1914-1939, and 1941-1944:
The Governmental Archive - Brest:
GOSUDARSTVENNYY ARKHIV BRESTSKOY OBLASTI
UL. ENGELSA 8,
BREST 224005,
BELARUS

* At the time on the Holocaust 1939-1944 and those searching for documents concerning Pinsk relatives:
Rita Margolin, our association member who works at the Yad Vashem Archives, in willing to help those searching for documents concerning Pinsk relatives. Those interested are invited to send Rita their requests to the following address:
Rita Margolin
Yad Vashem's Archives
P.O.B. 3477
Jerusalem 91034
Tel: 972-2-6443707
Fax: 972-2-6443719
E-mail:
rita.margolin@yadvashem.org.il

* People who arrived in Israel after 1945:
The Population Administration Office in
the Israel Bureau for Internal Affairs:
Tel: +972-2-6294701
Fax: +972-2-6294750
E-mail:
pniot@moin.gov.il
Web Site (Hebrew): www.tofes.gov.il/tfasim/homepage.aspx
In the web site there is a form to fill out.

The Search Department for Relatives in the Israel Absorption Bureau:
Search Department for relatives
2 Kaplan St., Jerusalem 91950, Israel

Tel: +972-2-6752762
Fax: +972-2-6752741

movie
Published at: 22/04/2012

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